Golden Krone Hotel: update and postmortem

A few notes on Golden Krone Hotel:

I’ve written a postmortem. I was happy with the overall product, but I made some big mistakes too.

I’ve released v1.2. It addresses several common complaints:

  • Support for smaller window sizes: 980×530 and 800×360
  • Green Man strength capped. No more 300 damage hits! :)
  • Potions can be described in the potion menu.
  • Potions are no longer shuffled (I had a good reason to do this to start, but I don’t think it’s worth the hassle)

If you’ve been putting off playing because of resolution or some annoyances with the game, now would be a good time to try it out. It’ll probably be the last update I make.

I also want to mention a couple Let’s Plays. Game Hunter did a good job covering GKH:

And if you’re not bothered by profanity, this is a really fun romp through the tower:

Rogue Station, Patch 1 Release

Rogue Station Patch 1 released.

http://www.roguebasin.com/index.php?title=Rogue_Station

Patch 1 Changelist:
- Shift to walk diagonally doesn’t have the same time-out as numkey diagonal movement.
- Room in room placement don’t account for rooms placing things on top of each other, so in such situations you might get station equipment under other station equipment, or hidden under other things.
- There’s been one report of trouble playing the game on Windows 8. Hopefully the new web player version will work, but this remain untested.
- There’s some issues related to starting a new game after game over / game won. Shutting down the game and starting it again is the only solution for now.
- There’s only a 5% chance for an air generator to spawn in a room, so on a lot of levels there’s not even a single spawn of air generators.
- There should be a choking sound when you start getting into orange levels of choking due to lack of air. It’s hard noticing the messages in the log when there’s no sound attached to it.
- Doesn’t support hjkl-yubn keymapping yet.
- Pressing Escape while in a station equipment menu or ability menu should exit that menu, not take you to the main menu.
- The introduction text says ‘wrack’, when it should say ‘wreckage’.
- One should be able to ‘look’ at stuff without actually bumping into it to find out what it is.
- Shooting could do with some improvements.
- Need to take more control over how weapons, repair kits and broken equipment is distributed, so that all games are winnable and all games share a similar difficulty level. Right now it’s too random, and no guarantee that a game is winnable.
- There should be a chance that a dead invader could hold a repair kit (searchable), to prevent no-win situations.
- Need to tweak the Transport cost a bit.
- There should be a rescue beacon counter.
- Many minor fixes.

Lava Walker – post mortem

Hi, I’m Volute, and with my partner Ygwee, who does the gamedesign, we’ve participated in the 7DRL for the second time. Last time we did Depths of Tuzua, an attempt of a multiplayer rogue-like. Implementing the multiplayer aspect took a lot of time and we weren’t able to add the features we had in mind. We didn’t do a multiplayer game this time.

The other thing that was different from last time is that we worked with Pixelatedcrown, who did the pixel art. I usually do the graphics and it was awesome not to have to worry about them at all and focus only on adding features. It saved us a lot of time.

Here’s the game we did: Lava Walker

Lava Walker

It’s a rogue-like with RPG elements where you play on an hex grid. You have a quest: you need to save your village from an evil dragon who’s raising an army in a volcano. The volcano is surrounded by lava, and the only way to go there and fight the dragon is to find an ancient relic that enables humans to walk on lava. Your quest will take you to 4 areas, 3 of them being ancient worlds populated by several families dangerous beings. You’ll loot more and more powerful stuff. You’ll be able to trade for arrows and potions with the locals, and also for magic spells. There are 9 of them, but you can equip only 3 at the same time, so you have to make a choice.

Lava Walker

We initially wanted to have a world that changes depending on what the player does, we wanted to implement a minimal artificial intelligence for the NPC so that they’re affected by the player’s decisions, but we quickly realized that it wouldn’t be possible in such a short time frame. Maybe in an extended version :)

Other than that, everything went very well. We try to participate in a lot of jams and it’s starting to pay off. My developpment speed has vastly improved and I’m able to keep my focus over longer periods of time. In the last 7DRL, I learned how to make a basic procedural dungeon generation, and it saved me a lot of time this year. In another jam (Ludum Dare), I learned how to make a procedural map generation based on perlin noise, which also helped me.

Lava Walker
a funny bug at the beginning of the jam

I used a lot of collaborative diffusion. It was quick and helpful in many ways: pathfinding, light diffusion, spawn of monsters around a dungeon, NPC placement… I wish there was more to read about it on the internet, it seems like an interesting concept. I’ve only been able to use it for basic stuff so far.

Lava Walker
another funny bug

Another thing that saved development time is using Flash. It’s a great prototyping tool. Building UI is something I don’t like to do, because there’s a lot of graphic assets manipulation and placement, but Flash makes it quick and painless. Put everything in a Movieclip and you’re good to go :)

Lava Walker
the big UI movieclip

A thing that went wrong is that I develop a custom system for managing the tilemap in order to avoid lag and memory issues on big maps, and this system proved tedious when I wanted to add small animations for the spells that move the player (sprint, charge…).

It was a great experience to participate in the 7DRL again and we hope you’ll like the game!

Play Lava Walker

Survival Horror 7DRL: March 15, 1924

March 15, 1924 Screen shot

Me and my friend, UntrustedLife, finished our 7DRL, and just forgot to post it here. Its called March 15, 1924. Overall, I think this game was a success. We implemented everything we wanted to, and everything meshes together well. The only thing I wish I could change is the background. I would use a photo of a typewriter and candles instead of my hand drawn charcoal.

Edit – One thing I forgot to add that’s important though, press c to look at the controls!

Forum post Here

Download Here

 

ElvinRL Notes

ElvinRL is my first ever attempt at the 7DRL Challenge.

Overall, I consider the effort a success. I didn’t get in quite all the features that I wanted, but nothing of critical importance was left out. I think there are still some bugs with robot movement/attack. Bugs notwithstanding, they are still very challenging opponents.

Another Visitor.

If you had a Commodore 64 back in the day, you probably remember a game called Impossible Mission. If not, you may want to review a video of game play.

In Impossible Mission, you are Super Agent 4125, tasked with infiltrating the underground complex of the evil Dr. Elvin Atombender.

Elvin is going to blow up the whole world in six hours unless you can find the password to his control room. Because he is so absent-minded, he leaves fragments of his password scattered in 36 pieces all over his fortress. Your job is to evade the robot guards, search the furniture for the pieces to his password, find his control room, and stop him from blowing up the world.

Stay Awhile…

ElvinRL (my entry for the 7DRL Challenge) is an Impossible Mission themed roguelike with the same goals: evade the robot guards, search the furniture for the pieces to the password, find the control room, and stop Elvin from blowing up the world.

http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~meade/elvin/ElvinRL.html

Controls

Arrow Keys = Movement
Space Bar  = Use / Search

Additional Commands (Main Gameplay Screen)

H = Hack for Passwords (must stand on Security Terminal)
M = Access MIA9366b Pocket Computer
S = Scan for nearby pit traps

Nominally, you have six hours to find all of the puzzle pieces. Every time you fall down a pit or get zapped by a robot, you lose 10 minutes.  Every time you scan for pit traps or hack security terminals for passwords you also lose time. Will you have enough time left to stop Elvin Atombender?

Stay Forever!

The source code for ElvinRL is located in a public GitHub Repository:
https://github.com/blinkdog/elvin-atombender

ElvinRL uses Ondřej Žára‘s brilliant rot.js library. This enabled me to make the game using a relatively modern browser as a platform. No download required, just navigate to the page and start playing. Note: Microsoft Internet Explorer users will need to use a different browser in order to play the game.

The game itself was written in CoffeeScript, a nice little language that compiles down to JavaScript. Using some packages available from npm (the package manager for Node.js), particularly browserify, it was easy to write the code in CoffeeScript modules, and still get it all bundled up into one simple download for the browser.

I was a little disappointed that I didn’t have enough time to make assembling the password from the puzzle pieces into a mini-game, as in the original Impossible Mission. I was little surprised to discover that ElvinRL is quite a difficult game! I haven’t been able to win it since I removed the cheat keys, although a co-worker informed me that he had won.

If you have played the original Impossible Mission, you’ll be in for a nostalgic treat, especially if you play with sound enabled. If you haven’t played the original, you may find my roguelike a little boring and repetitive. There isn’t much to do beyond avoiding robot guards and searching a garishly colored sprawling fortress for puzzle pieces to a mad man’s control room.

Good Luck Super Agent 4125!