Day 2: Mostly lighting stuff

My second day was mostly spent on trying to make normal mapping work in my WebGL 7drl. I finally managed to do that, but it took too much time for me to be completely happy and there still remains some tweaking. However, I did have time for something else apart from making the walls bumpy. I now have an actual dungeon generator instead of a hard-coded level, but it still needs a lot of work. Other notable things concern lights: they now pulsate slightly (not yet a satisfactory torch effect though) and the engine is now able to handle arbitrary number of them (the closest ones are determined and passed to the shaders).

Tomorrow I hope I can improve the map generator and also the actual visible wall geometry. I might also add some simple monsters.

Light in the dark

I started my WebGL based 7drl roughly 10 hours ago and I think I’ve gotten into a quite good start: I’ve got movement, basic collision detection, level loading from an ascii map and basic lighting with multi-light support.

Multi-light system
First day’s results: simple dungeon with lighting

I’ll probably continue by tweaking the shaders for prettier effects and trying to add randomness to those boring cube blocks.

WebGL is whispering to me from the shadows

I mentioned earlier that I am going to do a 7drl with C++ and OpenGL (probably testing out Qt toolkit’s OpenGL module), but now WebGL, the JavaScript OpenGL ES bindings for use inside a web browser, has started to taunt me increasingly. I am no expert with JavaScript and I usually prefer compiled, statically typed languages for games and stuff, but with the rise of HTML5, increasing my JS knowledge could come in handy.

WebGL also has the advantage that it is a well-defined and contained set of OpenGL functionality, contrary to the desktop version where there are many different versions, each deprecating something etc, so that it becomes hard and confusing to figure out what functionality should be used (e.g. doing stuff in a deprecated way to maintain compatibility with older hardware or coding “the right, modern way” that’ll probably break many bad drivers).

So, looks like I might be leaning towards WebGL, but need to read a couple of more tutorials and run some tests before I can say for sure.

My venture: “Fear of the Dark” (or something)

Last year I made a successful 7DRL called City of the Condemned (link) and I originally thought to make a multiplayer version 2 this year, but I’ve changed my mind and am planning to do something completely different.

My idea is to create a very simple, short and straight-forward roguelike, but do as much of it as possible with OpenGL shaders  as I want to learn more GLSL. Now I’m probably not going to break the tradition too much as the player and monsters are most likely still going to be letters and the view is more or less top-down, but I plan to do something nice looking with lighting and walls.

As with almost all of my coding, I shall use C++ as the programming language, Git as version control, CMake as build system and the thing will be open-source and cross-platform, with binaries for Linux and Windows (I don’t have a Mac and cross-compiling for it is close to impossible 🙁 )