Han Yolo and the Mys­te­ri­ous Planet Day 5

We focused the day on finalizing the movement system and get basic interaction going. A first iteration of shooting mechanic was set up, and general clean-up of mixed features. All in all a very important day that will hopefully lay the foundation for gameplay-feature grind these last two days!

If you missed our Day 0 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 1 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 2 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 3 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 4 report, check it out here.

Han Yolo and the Mys­te­ri­ous Planet Day 4

Bill has been on fire today producing some seriously cool art and effects!

It’s starting to look like a game! Too bad my end of things has gone less smooth today, as I started adapting the pathfinding behavior to a turn-based scheme… It was simple enough to get the player to spend turns as he moves over new cells, but much harder to make monsters plan towards the player, while picking a direction over cells in such a way that they stop in the center of a cell once a turn is spent… At the end of today I’ve been running with an approach where I have one pathfinder that keeps track of the path to the player, then use this information to choose which adjacent cell in 8 directions to choose from, and path to that cell…

But when shit starts to fly, it’s time to get some sleep!

If you missed our Day 0 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 1 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 2 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 3 report, check it out here.

Han Yolo and the Mys­te­ri­ous Planet Day 3

Another day in the drain, but slowly gameplay start emerging from the trenches of this 7DRL. Although we’re all back at our daily jobs this week, it doesn’t stop the progress! Who needs sleep anyway…

Bill worked on an ability animation that lets you take cover behind a wall with a sharp corner, and emerge while firing, then slip back into cover.

He also worked, together with Petur, on the desert scene a bit more.

Strike a pose Han Yolo!

Screen from the Unity3D editor window.

I started my 7DRL work yesterday trying to merge Bill’s navmesh from the static scene into the generated dungeon, but to my horror realized it could only be pre-baked (this is the navigation system that comes bundled with Unity3D Pro). So, instead of rolling my own, which I probably should have done, I looked to SimplePath, a Unity3D extension, that does grid-based pathfinding.

While SimplePath worked and reacted dynamically to changing environments, it had some problems that would take too much time to work out. Like enemies would pile on top of each other, and there were no built in avoidance logic, which in the limited time of a 7DRL would have resulted in hacks! In addition, the code was quite obscure as I tried to adopt it to a turn-based scheme…

But there is one giant in the realm of Unity3D AI extensions, that I wasn’t aware of till now. Aaron’s A* Pathfinding Project. This feels professional to work with, and has soooo much bundled in!

Here it was much simpler to see how I could integrate respect for a turn-based scheme (though I ended up not finding the time to do so). But as I left the computer, I had a little chase game set up of robot critters trying to overwhelm you. Just to be clear, these robot critters were bundled with the Unity Example Project, AngryBots, and is not part of our 7DRL game. Good for testing though 🙂

The next step is to replace the player character with Han Yolo in this test, then let him shoot back!

Han Yolo and the Mys­te­ri­ous Planet Day 2

Day two has come and gone… Bill and Petur has been heavy at work fleshing out ideas and tiles for the outdoor desert / crash site, which is where you start your game. Bill also set up the walking system to work with Unity3D Navmesh.

Meanwhile, I’ve been slaving in the dungeon, trying to get the wall sections sealed off properly from the void, and I’m almost there! But this is taking too long, it’s really putting back the gameplay programming! Will have to get this done early tomorrow, so I can get on with the juicy stuff!

Yet another day of real life holding us back for a bit.

If you missed our Day 0 report, check it out here.
If you missed our Day 1 report, check it out here.

Han Yolo and the Mys­te­ri­ous Planet Day 1

So we’ve been off to a bit of a rocky start, with real life interfering a bit with the progress. Fear not though! For we shall come back tomorrow with stronger and faster progress!

Bill has been hard at work setting up shooting animations and it’s particle/lighting effects today, and also realigned all pivots for the dungeon tiles to center properly on the grid. He added a basic mouse controlled movement system in Playmaker too.

Petur, our second guy on art, started modelling the outdoor start area, where you’ll emerge from the crash site of your spaceship.

I really wanted to get the generated dungeons properly tiled. This isn’t trivial, as it would be if walls were full top-down 2D tiles, like an # ascii character, for instance. Instead, our tile-set requires four different types of wall corners in addition to the straight wall. We also need to take orientation into account. It becomes a task of pattern recognition and special cases… and this kind of stuff takes time!

At the beginning today, the dungeon looked like this:

Now it looks like this:

We had hoped to get the generated dungeons fully tiled today, and have our character running about and explore them, but couldn’t quite reach that goal. Fingers crossed for a more eventful progress-report tomorrow!

If you missed our Day 0 report, check it out here.

Han Yolo and the Mysterious Planet Day 0

Hereby I announce the start of our seven day roguelike, Han Yolo and the Mysterious Planet. We are a team mainly of two guys, Bill Lowe on art + visual scripting (Playmaker), and me, Pål Trefall, on code. We will be using Unity3D.

Crash landing on an alien planet, you must explore mysterious alien ruins in hope of survival.

We have done some preparatory work in Unity3D, since the engine isn’t bundled with roguelike features. Thus we’ve worked on a dungeon generator before the start of this 7DRL. It’s a weight-based algorithm that uses a mix of attraction strategies to guide room placement. At time of start, this is what it looks like: 7drl_00227drl_00257drl_0024

Bill has also done some preparatory tile tests, and our characters will be based on some of his previous work, simply because doing a full animated cast during the seven days isn’t really feasible.