Undertiled [7DRL 2017] [Success]

Download(Windows ,Linux, Mac, WebGL)

Undertiled is a procedurally generated puzzle game. The game consists of 6 randomly generated tile Levels. Your goal is to manage and find the hidden “ladder” tile of each level that will lead you to the next. To do that you need to collect information about the location of the ladder, from the various tile types on each tile map  before your turns go below 0. When you think you know where the “ladder” tile is hiding use the Dig button on that tile to confirm your guess.

This is my first ever “completed” game in playable form, although I want to improve it and polish it more in the near future. I am pretty new to game development and I used the 7DRL challenge as an opportunity to learn more about game programming and force my self to make an actually playable game. I would really appreciate any kind of feedback from you all since I want to know what people think of my work, what I do wrong, what I do right, and how I can improve.

Thanks for your time and I hope you might have a little bit of fun with this small project. Good luck!

P.S. Some important rules that I haven’t included in the in game “Game Rules” section of the current build are:

– The ladder can’t spawn at “Master Tile”.

– The ladder can’t spawn at an “Info Tile”.

– The ladder can’t spawn at the special “Distance” tile.

Unlichtwesen – Day 3 & 4

The end of day 4 sees quite good progress on the game. The player char is done, you can choose to dual-wield two out of 4 weapons (Dagger, Sword, Spear, Morningstar) and every weapon has two moves with differnet patterns and cooldown. This part is really fun and I may extend this in the future, thinking of other weapons and how the moves could be like.

The demons have procedurally generated names, titles and bodyparts now, that influence their stats. Example:

A basic set of move and attack patterns is available as well. Some combinations are already quite fun to battle against. However, this is the part I need to extend on until Saturday evening. Adding more and more patterns could also be an endless task, so I have to see what is feasible and wherelse polish is needed.

One thing I will most likely skip is a sort of progression system. I have some ideas in my mind, but they have the potential to completely screw up the game code and end in a last minute bugfest. The game should be fine in just fighting a demon and count win as you defeat it, just to restart and encounter a new enemy.

7DRL Unlichtwesen – Day 1 & 2

My try for this year: ‘Unlichtwesen’ is German somewhat for ‘dark creatures’ and it will be a game about demons. Made some notes before on concepts, but I just hope the scope is small enough for 7 days.
The concept is, to focus on 1on1-boss battles. I always felt boss battles could be an interesting item to create a 7DRL around. Bosses should be more than just powerfull regular monsters, they should be long battles with patterns to memorize and deadly blows while tanking a lot of hits. “Classic video game”-like. The bosses should posess some procedurally generated features, bodyparts and moves, so I made them demons ‘&’ to count for their potential chaotic nature and shape.
However, what I coded so far, is the playground and the basic move sets. The player has attacks with cooldowns and each weapon has a regular move and a strong move. Player is dual-wielding and can use both weapons in both ways to make chains and combos. The demons have a diverse moveset according to their limbs. Teeth bite on close range, fists pound in an area and tentacles swipe the field. All individual moves are triggered by a timer, to make a unique pattern for each demon.
I hope analysing the patterns, dodging the swipes and fencing back will be as fun as I imagine ;).
Latest pic. Split message output for monster and player is supposed to make pattern interaction more visible.

Hireling is ready to retire – 7drl 2017

So, next year, next 7drl. I’d say 2017 is a bit exeptional for me. At first, I was planning to take break on 7drls this year… But I got interesting idea and I didn’t manage to resist.

 

I used to work with python, and well-known roguebasin python+libtcod tutorial’s architecture. First time, in 2013, I was learning about writing roguelike game – Jotaf’s creation is great for starting project. Also, it’s decent architecture which just works, I was introducing own changes to the core of, say, engine. Just it, that codebase base is really good foundation for 7drl.

 

But, this year, I decided to change something. I’m going to use Go programming language, and make whole project open source. Hireling… will be my first big project in Go, so it’s more than likely that sources will be full of spaghetti and unidiomatic code. Altought, there are very small amount of Go games, so I hope that open sourcing my 7drl have some sense. Also, this language is great for multi-platform support, so I’m gonna release Windows version as well as Linux and OSX build. It’s possible that I’ll make builds for another OS’s, but I can’t guarantee that they are going to work in proper way.

 

But, what Hireling is ready to retire is gonna be? I have plan to make roguelike and interactive fiction crossover. Text interface, lots of descriptions (I’m cooperating with Kuba ‘coran’ Kowalik due his high English skills), maybe some ASCII art. 5 levels of dungeon, overworld city, hack and slash, some simple randomly generated quests. Nothing really big and unrealistic – I hope that the scope is small enough for 7drl, it’s my weak point.

 

I took inspiration from IF-roguelike Kerkerkruip (such a great game!), Mordor / Demise dungeon crawler games, and my old, unreleased Witcher-inspired project (which was inspired by good, old Darklands). I’m going to use some previously written code – parts about terminal handling (cross-platform text coloring, clearing terminal, etc). If I’d use ASCII art, probably most of them also were created some time ago. All mechanics and other game-specific content will be created from scratch. I’m going to post updates on my facebook page.

 

I’m really tired (and a bit drunk) now (1 PM here), so – I’ll start tomorrow. Also, I’m sorry for all mistakes and grammar errors, my English is a bit (?) rusty, unfortunately.

Good luck to all participiants!

Some Dogs Go To Hell – Success… of a sort.

Some Dogs Go To Hell is my first 7DRL entry, and indeed my first roguelike! I finished it on Saturday, but I haven’t quite had time to post about it ’till now. It’s a game about a dog who has died and been wrongfully sent to Hell, and must join together with other passed dogs to defeat the legions of the underworld and escape.

 

I’m calling it finished, though only just. I’m certainly not happy with it, and if I had an extra day or two there’s plenty I’d add, and plenty of issues left unfixed. Still, the core of the game was three ideas:

  1.  Gameplay based around the player character being able to see better than they can smell
  2. Complex NPC dogs that the player can convince, through correct application of social procedures (like playing and respecting other dog’s personal space) to help the PC, or by failure anger them into attacking
  3. Intricate and deadly Dwarf Fortress-esque tactical combat

… and those are all in there, and the game basically works, so in my books it’s a success.

 

SDGTH was done in Python 3, from scratch, using TDL, a wrapper for libtcod. I didn’t have any code written beforehand (besides the pathing and POV services libtcod provides, which is honestly the most complex code in the entire game,) though I did copy most of the systems architecture over from my other (still in development) game INJECTION.

I was gonna write a big long explanation of how the game was designed here, but WordPress isn’t cooperating. If anyone’s actually interested in it, maybe I’ll start my own blog and do it there or something.

Anyway, 7DRL was fun, if exhausting, and I’m glad I have something to show for it. I’m not going to work on SDGTH again for a while (I’m sick of looking at it!) but an enhanced post-7DRL version is definitely in the cards.

STRIVE – success

STRIVE is a game I made out of my love for shooters like Doom and Serious Sam. They bring a certain mix of strategy to combat that I adore. Key features are an array of diverse weaponry and enemies, where target prioritisation, positioning and using the right weapon on the right enemy is important to survive. This is the core mechanic of STRIVE.

After a week of head-on development I can finally say it’s finished!

Features

  • animated combat and gore
  • an array of interesing weapons, items and enemies
  • an increasing number of enemy hordes (rack up hundreds of kills!)
  • BOOMSTICKS AND CHAIN EXPLOSIONS

I am very pleased with the result myself, even though at times it felt like an uphill battle (blame my self-taught C++ antics). The game runs well and people have been enjoying it already! This is my first entry to the 7DRL challenge but it certainly won’t be my last.

The game is available on Windows.

You can download it here: http://supperdev.itch.io/strive

strive2

Credits

The game uses SDL and The Doryen Library.
Spritesheet was made by Alloy (found on http://dwarffortresswiki.org/)

Space Scavenger – Success

First submission, first success.

Screen Shot 2015-03-16 at 12.28.03 AM

You can find it here

As I don’t play a ton of roguelikes, I had to pick and choose the elements which I thought would help keep me interested. In spirit, I believe I kept true to the roguelike. If I had more time, I’d do more of a XP system, which would’ve been nice.

Because I was running out of time, I had to reach out to someone else to compose the music, and that turned out fantastic! Thanks for that goes to Jeremy “mangopear” Bell